VIVED Learnings engages students in learning

Testimonials

Cyber Anatomy Corp has been selected for the 2019 Best of Coralville Award in the Education & Training Software category by the Coralville Award Program. Each year, the Coralville Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Coralville area a great place to live, work and play. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2019 Coralville Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Coralville Award Program and data provided by third parties.

Best of Coralville

Award

I have been using VIVED in my Zoology classes for over three years. It has added a whole new dynamic to my classroom. The VR activities have truly enhanced student learning and engagement. Every Monday when I go over the weekly agenda and my students see VIVED, they get excited. It is a field trip within the school building! The opportunity to explore and dissect the anatomies of animals that are impossible first-hand is priceless. The program and activities are easy to use for both teacher and students. As a teacher, I have used existing lessons and have developed my own. I have found both ways to be beneficial to my students whether I am introducing, reinforcing or reviewing an animal. The VR experience of VIVED is indeed an extraordinary learning tool for my classroom. Check out the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ghh-lmn7N0

Heidi Bernandi

Valpraiso High School

VIVED Anatomy is the core program around which our virtual anatomy curriculum revolves. Our virtual anatomy lab (VAL) is the first of its kind in the state of Arizona and the ability to view difficult anatomy--and the corresponding cross-sectional imagery--is invaluable to our students' understanding of anatomy. Today, medical students no longer view anatomy in operating room as "open" procedures. Endoscopic technology has revolutionized anatomy to the point where so many operations are performed in two-dimensions, and viewed by the surgeon on a television monitor, that a program like VIVED Anatomy, which blends 3D anatomy with cross-sectional two-dimensional anatomy, bridges the gap in the visualization of the human body not previously available. The cadaver remains a tool but not the ONLY tool and, dare I say, no longer the most important tool, in the education of medical professionals. Programs like the VIVED Anatomy supplement, when integrated into the medical school curriculum, could potentially change the way students learn anatomy before they step into an operating room.

Jay Crutchfield

MD, FACS: Dept. of Anatomy Director for the School of Osteopathic Medicine (Arizona)

VIVED Anatomy is the core program around which our virtual anatomy curriculum revolves. Our virtual anatomy lab (VAL) is the first of its kind in the state of Arizona and the ability to view difficult anatomy--and the corresponding cross-sectional imagery--is invaluable to our students' understanding of anatomy. Today, medical students no longer view anatomy in operating room as "open" procedures. Endoscopic technology has revolutionized anatomy to the point where so many operations are performed in two-dimensions, and viewed by the surgeon on a television monitor, that a program like VIVED Anatomy, which blends 3D anatomy with cross-sectional two-dimensional anatomy, bridges the gap in the visualization of the human body not previously available. The cadaver remains a tool but not the ONLY tool and, dare I say, no longer the most important tool, in the education of medical professionals. Programs like the VIVED Anatomy supplement, when integrated into the medical school curriculum, could potentially change the way students learn anatomy before they step into an operating room.

Darren Hoffman

PhD, University of Iowa